Enjoy Not Knowing

Just another American living in Sweden


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portobello mushrooms with balsamic and thyme

If you like mushrooms keep reading. Even if you don’t like mushrooms you should probably know this recipe anyway. Just in case. You never know. These portobello mushrooms are to die for, so it’s a good recipe to have in your arsenal.

Prior to this fated evening I had only ever grilled portobello mushrooms. Yes, I’m new here, despite this the recipe was easy to follow and resulted in delightfully scrumptious mushrooms. Find the original Eggton recipe/description here.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp. + 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 3 large cloves garlic, passed through a garlic press (Eggton says chopped is fine, but I hate chopping garlic)
  • 12 oz. portobello mushroom caps, cut into 1/2″ strips
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1 tbsp. fresh thyme
  • 1/2 tsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar

Ingredients assembled! (Ignore the eggs, those are for something else)

Directions:

  1. In a medium or large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-low heat. When it’s hot, add the garlic. Sautée for a minute. Make sure the garlic isn’t browning or frying up. 
  2. Add the mushrooms, salt and thyme. At first, the skillet will be dry except for the oil. 10-15 minutes into cooking, they will be dark and will have released their water content into the skillet. 
  3. At this point, add the sugar and the vinegar. Cook, stirring occasionally, at least 5 minutes more, until most of the liquid in the skillet has evaporated.

Since I had only ever grilled portobello mushrooms, I had no idea what Eggton meant by a dry skillet. This is what she meant.

Aaaand wet.


Eggton recommends that one spoons the mushrooms over goat cheese on toasted bread and drizzle with olive oil and coarse salt. (Sounds ridiculously fantastic). Or toss on salads, put in omelets, incorporate into pasta sauces, what have you. 

Now, I do like Eggton’s serving suggestions, but let’s be real. These mushrooms are so good you’ll just end up slurping them all up while standing over the still hot frying pan like I did. Be real. Be like me.

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twice-baked potatoes

These are actually Rebekah’s twice-baked potatoes. I don’t actually know Rebekah, but she knows her potatoes! Eggton posted about these scrumptious spuds a while back, and as usual her pictures make me want to eat my computer screen.

I haven’t changed the instructions much, but definitely check out the original post here.

Ingredients:

  • 3 medium russet potatoes
  • 2 Tbsp. of olive oil (or a little bacon grease, for the true Southern experience)
  • a few dashes of kosher salt
  • 4 Tbsp. butter (half a stick), cut into a bunch of smaller pats
  • 3 oz.+ whipped cream cheese spread (buy an 8-0z. container)
  • 1/4 c.+ heavy whipping cream (buy a half pint)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 1/2 c.  grated cheddar cheese
  • a dash of cayenne pepper

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Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. (Or 205 centigrade).
  2. Thoroughly scrub and dry the potatoes and poke a bunch of holes in each with a fork.  Rub olive oil into the skins, coating them thoroughly. Place the potatoes on a baking sheet and sprinkle with kosher salt. (I chose to generously sprinkle).
  3. Bake 45 minutes to an hour or more, until they give a little when handled with a potholder or they’re tender when pierced with a fork (it’ll depend on the size of your potatoes). Remove the potatoes from the oven and let them cool enough to handle (Eggton says you can just proceed here if you want, holding them in a towel or something – I was afraid of burning myself so I waited). In the mean time reduce the heat to 350 degrees (176 C).
  4. Cut the potatoes in half lengthwise and carefully scoop out the insides with a spoon and transfer the insides to a mixing bowl.  Be careful to leave a little potato flesh on the skins so that the potato skin stays up like a canoe.  (If you dig too much out from the side walls, the papery skins will tear or collapse inwards and it’ll be harder to fill.)
  5. Add the butter and the whipped cream cheese to the baked potato and beat in a mixer until smooth.  (If you don’t have a mixer, you could use a potato smasher.)  Beat in the cream and some salt and pepper. Taste it. Here’s where Eggton adds more whipped cream cheese and more cream because, you know, what the heck. Some people also throw in pieces of bacon, green onions, and some grated cheddar at this point.
  6. Mound the baked potato mixture into the potato skins you hollowed out. It’s okay if the filling rises above the brim of the skin. Sprinkle some of the grated cheddar cheese on top of each and then sprinkle with a dash of cayenne if you want. (You should want the cayenne).
  7. Place the potatoes back on the baking sheet and return them to the oven until they’re heated through and the cheese is melted.

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I love me some potatoes, and I love me some cheese, so the combination is always a hit with me. I made some with less cheese for Evelina, promptly forgot which were which and we just ate them as they came. Try out the recipe, let me know what you think!

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the eggton

Eggton, the awesome blog which I dedicatedly stalk follow, is wittily named after Eggton’s own invention: The Eggton.

I know you just can’t wait to find out what this concoction will be! The wait is over my friends, the secret is revealed!

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The Eggton is the genius combination of croutons and scrambled eggs. The harmony between which create an absolutely scrumptious breakfast experience. Let’s get cracking! (I couldn’t resist).

Original recipe found here.
Ingredients:

  • a small pat of butter
  • a small handful of croutons
  • 2-3 eggs
  • a little of your favorite cheese (optional)
  • salt & pepper

Directions:

  1. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium to low heat.
  2. Toss in the croutons.
  3. Crack the eggs into the skillet.  Cook for a minute before breaking the yolks.  Break the yolks with your spatula and toss the eggs with the croutons, coating evenly.
  4. Add some cheese if you like.
  5. Season with salt and pepper and cook until desired doneness.

I went with croutons seasoned with garlic and parsley, and Eggton agrees that croutons with garlic are a good way to go. Just writing this post has me looking forward to Sunday morning breakfast!

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chilled honey oats

In keeping with my 30 before 30 list I’ve made one of Eggtons recipes, this time chilled honey oats. For a while now I’ve wanted to try out refrigerating oats, there are a ton of recipes and tasty looking pictures these days on social media that have enticed me to finally do it.

Though I really have no idea how so many people can take such nice pictures of oats. Seriously. It’s ridiculously difficult.

As per the usual I followed Eggtons recipe essentially to a T.

  
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 c. rolled oats
  • 1 c. whole milk (or cream)
  • 1/2 c. of your favorite yogurt
  • 2 tsp. honey (can substitute agave nectar – though I don’t know what this actually is)
  • 1 tsp. chopped orange peel (from 1 orange)
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla
  • 1/4 c. orange juice
  • 2 tart apples (such as granny smith or pink ladies)
  • other fruits or berries (optional)
  • nuts (optional)

  

  

Directions:

  1. Combine the first 8 ingredients in a container with a lid and refrigerate for at least 5 hours or overnight (I chose over night, because I wanted to eat the oats for breakfast).
  2. Prior to serving, peel the apples and shred them down to the core using the side of a cheese grater that you’d use to shred cheese for a pizza. Do this directly prior to eating so your apples don’t turn brown.
  3. Toss the apple into the mix and stir to combine.  Taste it.  Adjust the consistency and flavors as desired–you can add more orange juice for acidity, milk or cream to thin it out, and honey to pick up the sweetness.
  4. Serve with berries, other fresh fruit, and your favorite nuts.

  
The mixture can be refrigerated again and eaten again the next day. Which is, of course, what I chose to do.

  
Definitely don’t forget to check out Eggton’s page for much prettier pictures. I think I need more sunshine, that’s how to get my oats to look better…

 


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happy thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving my American friends! Sweden has yet to accept my suggestion, despite the fact that I left it in the suggestion box over two years ago, and American Thanksgiving is not yet a national holiday. This means Evelina and I are forced to celebrate both the Saturday before and the Saturday after actual Thanksgiving Day. But don’t feel too badly for us, because the food is still awesome.

It’s getting easier and easier to find things like turkey, sweet potatoes, squash and canned pumpkin in Sweden. I’m pretty sure my buying four turkeys in the past five years has stimulated supply and demand here. Though they still have no idea what to charge me for canned pumpkin when I bring it up to the register.

turkey 2015

Thanksgiving 2015

Yum!

pecan pie 2015

Evelina and I have enjoyed one Thanksgiving dinner with one to go, I hope everyone back home has a great day today. And please think of us this Saturday when we’re forced to celebrate because Sweden won’t give me today off from work to cook all day.

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baked bbq chicken

I know you’ve all been on the edge of your seats wondering when the next Eggton recipe would appear here. Wait no longer, because Eggtons BBQ sauce is here and it is unreal. Again I pretty much follow her instructions to a T. Or do my best to, and the original recipe is found here.

Ingredients:

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 1/2 c. salted or unsalted butter
  • 1/2 yellow or Vidalia onion, very finely chopped
  • 1 1/4 c. ketchup
  • 1 c. apple cider vinegar (but you can substitute white vinegar or white wine vinegar)
  • 1/4 c. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/8 c. Dijon mustard
  • 1 Tbsp. packed brown sugar (or more, to taste)
  • juice from 1 lemon

Eggton says it makes sauce for four chicken breasts with 1 cup left over. But I had maybe two cups left over, so I hope I followed the instructions correctly.



 Directions:

  1. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and simmer until the onion is very soft, about 8-10 minutes.  Stir occasionally and be careful not to brown them. (I don’t know why you’re not supposed to brown them, but I assume we should just listen to this one.)
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and whisk the sauce together. Increase the heat so that the sauce comes to a boil, then decrease it to a low simmer.  Let the sauce cook for at least 15 minutes, and up to 30 minutes, so that the flavors meld. (I cooked the sauce for about 25.)
  3. Heat the oven to 290 degrees celsius.  Clean the chicken breasts and lay them in a baking dish.  Spoon BBQ sauce generously on top and under each chicken breast, being careful not to touch the spoon to the chicken and then put it back in the pot of sauce (Food safety tip #1 from Eggton).
  4. Bake the chicken until it’s no longer pink in the middle and has reached an internal temperature of 165 degrees, about 25 minutes.

As per the usual, Eggton pairs her instructions with great pictures:

Cook up this sauce, grab your chicken, and dig in!

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black bean soup

Eggton does it again with a vegetarian (or vegan if desired) black bean soup. Now that fall is on its way a nice hot soup is a go to meal to keep toasty warm. Original recipe found here.

Once again I didn’t stray much from Eggton’s instructions. I’ve found that’s the best way for me to have success in the kitchen. It unfortunately doesn’t guarantee I don’t get burned.

Black bean soup ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tbsp. butter or olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 ribs celery diced (did you guys know they’re called ribs?!)
  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 c. vegetable broth
  • 1 15-oz. can tomato sauce
  • 2 410g cans black beans, drained but not rinsed
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. ketchup (use a vegan ketchup if you’re vegan)
  • 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce (omit if vegan)
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. cumin

Cooking black bean soup

Directions:

  • In a large pot or a big skillet with raised sides, melt the olive oil or butter over medium heat.
  • Add the chopped onion and celery and carrot.  Sauté until the onion is tender and translucent but not browned, lowering the heat if necessary.  Add the garlic and cook another couple of minutes.
  • Add the remaining ingredients and stir to combine.  Raise the heat to bring it to a boil and then lower it so that the soup simmers for 20 minutes (or less – but if you cook it really fast your veggies might still be a little crunchy – I seriously recommend cooking the veggies fast, so good!).
  • Purée half or all of the soup with a hand mixer (Eggton recommends a blender or food processor, we don’t have that and the hand mixer worked great) then stir it back into the pot.
  • Taste the soup and adjust the seasoning as desired.  If it’s too thick for your taste, add more broth and reheat. Serve with sour cream and cheese if you like (provided you’re not vegan).

black bean soup

This soup was so good I could honestly eat it every week this fall. I won’t because then I may turn into a black bean. As the old adage goes: you are what you eat.

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