Enjoy Not Knowing

Just another American living in Sweden

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raspberry scones

Here we go! Number 10/10 on my list of recipes from Eggton’s scrumptious blog. I almost can’t believe it. Mostly I can’t believe it because I thought this was post 8, then I scanned through my past posts and realized I hadn’t listed two of my recipe posts. So, here it is. The final recipe for number 21 on my 30 before 30 list.

These scones couldn’t be a better pick to wrap up this list. Seriously guys, you gotta make these.

For any clarity needs and a side bar on Ranger Rick and tulip cruelty, here’s the original post.

The ingredients you will need:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 8 tbs. butter cut into 12 inch cubes and then frozen (since this is in italics you know it’s serious)
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup frozen raspberries (again, important word in italics)

The steps you will take:

  1. Mix dry ingredients in a bowl; flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Whisk everything to reduce clumps.
  2. Add frozen butter to the bowl. Eggton says to use a pastry blender or a dough scraper here, I don’t have those appliances so I used a hand mixer. My scones tasted awesome (though you’ll never know if I’m telling the truth, will you?). Regardless, I say a hand mixer also works. You’ll just have to trust me. You’re done mixing when the largest pieces of butter are about the size of a pea.
  3. Pour the cream into the mixture and mix with your hands. Again with the italics, yes. Stop when the cream is no longer creamy and the dough is sticky. There will still be loose flour in the bowl. Deep breath, it’s supposed to be there.
  4. Turn the mixture onto a lightly floured counter and form into a rectangle. Flip it over and form a rectangle again, repeat this until the rectangle is no longer coming apart. (Or coming apart less). Handle the dough as little as possible so the small chunks of butter stay intact.
  5. Use a lightly floured rolling pin to flatten the rectangle into a pan 8×10 rectangle as best you can. Push it back together if it comes apart.
  6. Gently press the frozen raspberries into the bottom 2/3 of the dough. It’s okay if the raspberries break and/or don’t really press into the dough.
  7. Fold the top third of the dough over the raspberries. Use a knife or other tool to scrape under the dough first, if necessary. This will result in a log(ish) shape.
  8. Gently roll the log into a rectangle using the lightly floured rolling pin. Eggton says it should be 1 inch thick, mine were not, but good for you if you can get them that thin. Cut the flattened dough into triangles and transfer the triangles into the freezer.
  9. Heat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit or 200 degrees Celsius. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  10. Remove the triangles from the freezer, place two inches apart on the baking sheet, and brush each scone with a thin layer of cream. Sprinkle each scone with a little bit of sugar to really top everything off.
  11. Bake for 20 min (or more) until the scones are golden brown and your home smells wonderful.
  12. Allow the scones to cool on the baking sheet for a while before moving to the cooling rack. Or before eating every single scone while standing hunched over the oven. Your call.

The wonderful scones you will eat:

Until next time!



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book of february: all the light we cannot see


My Mum recommended I read this book, and I’m so glad she did. To be honest I started reading it this summer. Don’t take my somewhat extended reading time to mean that the book isn’t captivating – oh it is! The real truth (in stark contrast to the fake truth) is that I borrowed the book from the library to my tablet, didn’t realize it had been automatically downloaded, and then only had a few days left to read a 500+ page book. Which evidently was not enough time. Also the hold line for the book is a constant 100+ people.

Finally in February I once again got my mitts on a copy of this somewhat elusive book and finished it off. It is wonderful. I’m not at all surprised it’s won a Pulitzer Prize. Anthony Doerr’s story telling is something worth experiencing. Plus you get to ingest such lovely words as “extirpation” and phrases like “amphitheater of noise”. (Don’t worry, that doesn’t give anything away.)

A story revolving around the second world war and set in France and Germany where the two main characters lives are wonderfully detailed by Doerr. Read this book. Even if it takes you half a year to get your act together enough to finish it. Worth it.


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book of january: the life-changing magic of tidying up

My dearest bought this book recently. She was so inspired by the book that she shared it with me and I’ve also spent the time to gather some knowledge from it. Marie Kondo is superlatively enthusiastic about tidying up. Which of course is a good thing if you’re going to write a book about it.


As the reader I was struck multiple times by Kondo’s attention to detail. Which, again, shouldn’t be all that surprising. None the less, I found myself surprised. I learned a lot from Kondo’s book. Like “it isn’t desireable to stay in a stat of excitement forever”. True dat.

I really like the book, and it’s gotten me excited about the forthcoming 6 months where our home project will be to handle all of our possessions to find out if they bring us joy. Read the book and you’ll know what I’m talking about. And know I’m (probably) not a total kook.

The big take home is to tidy in the right order:

Step 1: Discard

Step 2: Decide where to put things

Yeah that’s it. But you gotta do it all in one fell swoop, Kondo says 6 months is an appropriate amount of time (so, yeah I didn’t get that from nowhere). Though I did find the book a little heteronormative at times, I generally really liked it. Plus, I’m super pumped to get at the tidying!


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swedish word of the month: fika

2018 is officially underway and I’m excited to start something new for the year here at ENK. Every month I’ll post a new Swedish word for your enjoyment. In this way you too, dear reader, can learn some important, interesting and/or usefully vocabulary for your next visit to the land of IKEA.

For my first word I have chosen fika. Those who know me, read this blog, or have ever been to Sweden know the importance of this holy-to-a-godless-people ritual. I’ve written quite a bit on the subject of fika here on ENK. The first mention was in March 4th, 2012 where I list seven important things to know about Sweden.¬†This was the first of two posts featuring a short list of important things Swedish – both of which mention the all mighty fika ritual.

I’ve tagged the word “fika” in 13 (now 14) posts, so you know it’s a hot topic here. The most encompassing fika post however is what is fika?

Pronounced fee-kah (realizing now I’ve never explained this), the daily tradition of taking some time to sit down for some coffee and a tasty treat to eat is observed in many settings. At work you get a fikapaus (break for fika). Many a Sunday afternoon is spent having fika with friends, family, or strangers at a local coffee shop. Don’t worry, you don’t have to limit yourself to coffee if you’re not a coffee drinker *gasp*. Tea, hot chocolate, juice, milk…yes, your beverage of choice may be consumed at this midday meeting of minds. The highlight of any good fika is, often, the company you’re with. Good conversation may be the true highlight of any fika. Conversation and the coffee. Coffee is really quite a highlight for me. Coffee:


Fika is for anyone and everyone. Come one, come all! Sweden isn’t just the land of IKEA but also the land of fika.


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2017, that happened


My last blog post that did not feature a book was in July. That’s quite a few months of happenings with no writing. In fact, after doing a quick scroll through of my 2017 blog I now realize I’ve only posted 7 times outside of my book of the month posts. Seven:

  1. one year old
  2. finally 2017 (a look ahead)
  3. ry-guy
  4. mediwift
  5. t-man
  6. 15 days: my iphone withdrawal story
  7. four(teen)th of july

Either there’s not a whole lot going on for me, or a whole helluva lot. To be honest, definitely some of both. So, yeah, that happened. I do want to continue my recent tradition of reverse bucket listing my year. This year’s list will serve two purposes: it’s a great way to reflect on the good times of 2017, and is also a list of blog posts soon to be featured here:

  1. Hosted wintry guests
  2. Went on a cruise
  3. Celebrated weddings in Newport, RI and Sundance, UT
  4. Traveled to the western USA with my family
  5. Saw the Grand Canyon
  6. Went to Vegas
  7. Followed my savings plan
  8. Coached a growing group of girls
  9. Attended my 10 year high school reunion
  10. Completed another year of my ECE degree

I’ll stop at 10, because that’s been my modus operandi the previous two years, but there may be an extra post or two coming down the pipeline with happenings from the eventful 2017 – like my epic summer vacation. Get ready, 2018 is here.


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book of december: fantastic beasts and where to find them: the original screen play

Well, 2017 is coming to a close. As such here comes the year’s final botm:

In the name of honesty I want to tell you something. I did something questionable. I watched the movie before reading the book. I gotta say, though, as this is the screen play I think I get a pass on this one. If you haven’t seen the movie, do. It’s a good one. If you haven’t read the screen play…well you can, I enjoyed doing it. If you’re a die hard Rowling fan and want to read everything she’s written – then you’ve probably already read it since it came out a while ago.

It was a fun, quick read. To end a fun, quick year. Strange how looking back on a year makes it seem so short, but looking ahead opens a world of possibilities. Strange. Here’s to looking ahead.